Tag Archives: psychology

Results – Tom

After all of my work this semester, I have finally finished my experiment. While it took five days of running the experiment, I was able to get a pretty decent yield. Overall, I had 83 good results, which is over a fifth of the entire school. I ended up having to throw out a handful because something or other went wrong during the experiment. Most often this was because they choose to reject but never proposed a counter offer. Continue reading

Deception for Good – Tom

I was discussing my procedure with my mentor last week when an interesting detail came up. The importance of making sure that the participants in the study do not think it is about race. This is important for an obvious reason, if people think that I am going to be observing how they interact with race, they will be paying more attention to how race is affecting them. But this is a study about the implicit effects of race, and so calling attention to it would completely ruin all of my data. Sadly, I must say, that means all of you aren’t going to be able to be participants. Continue reading

Procedure Update – Tom

Since last week was a bit of a tangent, I want to give an update about the procedure for my study in this blog post. I’ve finally narrowed it down to two different game theory scenarios I might use for my study. In truth, it is actually just two different forms of the ultimatum game. I have discussed the ultimatum game before on my blog, but it never hurts to have a refresher. How it works is one of the two players has been given a dollar and gets to offer a way to split it. The other player can either accept or reject the proposed split. If they accept, the dollar gets divided in the proposed way. If they reject, then nobody gets anything. It is a simple game, but when played out has many small physiological subtitles. Continue reading

A New Path – Tom

It is a new semester, and my independent is taking a very new direction. I wrapped up my game theory course, and now I am moving onto implicit bias. Like Alyssa said, implicit bias is changes in how people act based on subconscious factors. It is often in the headlines these days due to how it affects many different aspects of our society, be it college admissions or racial profiling. Continue reading

Closing Time- Brandon

This week I made a lot of good progress and found a few new articles to use. Right now I’m shooting to have around 3-5 sources that I directly cite in my paper. I’m also reading a few chapters from a book Teacher Deb gave me called When She Was White: The True story of a family divided by race, which looks at how traumas and hardships affect memory.  Since this is the last blog I will write at Westtown I want to do a short wrap-up and reflection. Continue reading

Sifting Through Articles-Brandon

After reading through a large number of articles this week, I have picked a subject and started writing an outline. I originally thought of writing about different memorization techniques and comparing them with one another to see which is best for the situation. This past week however, I came across an article titled How (And Why) Emotion Enhances the Subjective Sense of Recollection.   Continue reading

Emotion-Brandon

 

This week’s lecture on emotion was one of my favorites. I suspect that many people including myself have trouble decoding their own emotions at times. Sometimes we feel sad, happy, excited, or scared and can’t pinpoint why.  Even when we can identify the cause of an emotion such as a spider with fear, most of us don’t know why we react the way we do. Surprisingly, evolution plays a huge role in why we feel the way we do. Continue reading

What is Love?-Brandon

This week’s lecture was a great break from the usual routine. The President of Yale College, Professor Peter Salovey spoke about emotion, specifically love. He is best known for pioneering the concept of emotional intelligence. He also noted that many of the studies he references are from the 1950s and 1960s and not considered ethical by today’s standards. Also, most of these studies are anglocentric and heterocentric. Salovey said that it is up to the audience to decide whether or not these studies can be generalized so I’ll leave that to you.  Continue reading