Category Archives: Science

Managing the Tanks Over Break and Returning from Break – Nick

      I was extremely excited over break as well as my return because of how much the experiment would progress. The next phase of the project was organizing the stabilization of the water in the tanks, figuring out the specifics on our actual coral specimens, then we had to sort out how we are going to set up the platform in which we are going to place the corals, and we had to finalize plans on the lighting fixture.

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Initial Data Exploration – Alina

In this blog, I am going to share with you my initial exploration of the data that I collected last month. I am also experimenting with visualizing the data with R, which is a statistical programming language, but we will talk about that another time.

This time, I first looked at the data collected from two sites, US and Chinese, separately. I graphed the data as a line graph. The graphs contained data from all categories of dates – next-day, next-week, next-month, 6/4 (a date far in the future), and 11/1 (a date in the very near future) – as 5 series of lines of different colors. Continue reading

Medicine in the Renaissance Era– Yuchen

Medicine in the Renaissance Era
Yuchen Cao

My initial plan for the first semester was to finish studying the timeline of medical history– from the simple but ingenious tools used by the Neanderthals to the highly advanced diagnostic and treatment technologies used in modern-day hospitals. However,    as I moved along the timeline, I found that there are many aspects intertwined with the progress of medicine: religion, culture, politics and many more. It is such a rich field of study that I am only able to reach the Renaissance period by the end of the semester. In this blog post, I will be looking at medicine during the Renaissance era in Europe, the Middle East and China, and touch upon medicine during the Early Modern Age. Next semester, I will pick up from here and move forward.  Continue reading

The Fourier Series: An Introduction – Baiting

In the past few weeks and Thanksgiving break, I finished Unit II and moved on to Unit III. In this unit, I will primarily focus on the Fourier Series, Laplace Transformation, their connections with Differential Equations, and their applications in reality. In this blog, I will introduce the Fourier Series of periodic functions, including the trigonometry functions, the sin and cos. Continue reading

Genitourinary Cancer Research: a setback – Dhillon

wcuSeal

(University Seal [Photograph]. (n.d.). Retrieved from West Chester University
database)

I thought it would be smooth sailing after Thanksgiving break, and I could begin my research. However, after meeting with T. Mariska who brought into light some issues. We have decided to push back research till after Winter break. During our meeting, we discussed possibilities regarding storage as well as the length it would take to culture my cells. After further discussions, we have established that it may be best for me to begin research after winter break. This is because of the short turnaround between Thanksgiving and Winter Break. The estimated cost of the needed FBS (Fetal Bovine Serum), NBT-ii cell line, and the medium is about $1,189.00.

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Assembling My Experiment and Beginning Water Stabilization -Nick

This has been the most exciting two weeks so far in the duration of this project. This is because all of my materials arrived, so I was able to start to assemble my experiment. This also meant that all of my knowledge about my experiment and my procedure because I needed to properly compile all of my materials and place everything with intention and purpose.

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Medicine in the Late Middle Ages– Yuchen

Continuing from my last blog post on medicine during the High Middle Ages, this blog post still follows the similar format, covering medicine during the Late Middle Ages in Europe, the Middle East and China. While doing my research, I was surprised by the extent of which Islamic Medicine influenced Western medicine. Therefore, a significant portion of this blog post is about medicine in the Middle East. Continue reading

Genitourinary Cancer​: NBT-II -Dhillon

NBT-II, Nara Bladder Tumor No. 2, currently our most promising cell line since receiving news that the RT-4 cell line is not a possibility and any other human or primate-derived cell line. NBT-II is a tumor that is derived from the urinary bladder of a male rat. Although it is not RT-4 which is an epithelial bladder cancer cell line derived from a 63-year-old caucasian male and was the initial cell line I was planning on using. One major issue, regardless of the cell line I use, is how I am going to store the cells without liquid nitrogen when I am on breaks. This is because many cell lines require liquid nitrogen as a means of storage over lengthier periods of time (weeks).

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Gathering Materials and Planning Setup – Nick

   These two weeks have been a bit of a change. Instead of looking at different research articles and various YouTube tutorials, I was actually able to make this vision start to come to life with the addition of the first round of materials. This means that the next phase of my project is beginning.

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Medicine in the High Middle Ages– Yuchen

In this blog post, I would explore medicine during the High Middle Ages by using a similar format as that of my previous blog post, which focused on three general regions–Europe, the Middle East and China.

Medicine during the High Middle Ages

Europe–

The expansion and consolidation of power of the kings of France, Spain and England gradually stabilized Europe, restoring vitality to medicine and other fields of study.   Continue reading