Category Archives: History and Current Issues

What I Wanted To Hear From My President on February 1st – India

 

On the first of the month, Donald Trump held a breakfast and “get-together” to celebrate Black History Month in the White House. The video below is from that meeting. My comments on the video will make the most sense if you watch the video first.

While I recognize that this was just the first day of Black History Month and there is (hopefully) more celebrating and conversations to come, I am saddened with the way that Trump started off. Not only was he reading from a script with the most basic information about Black History, but within the first 60 seconds of the meeting he begins talking about false racist accusations against him and tries to clear his name. It actually happens many times throughout the meeting that the subject is changed to something that has to do with him and while I am not sure of the exact intentions of this meeting, I do not think that we need to be taking that much time to talk about Mr. Trump (or rather him taking that much time to talk about himself). It comes off as if he is doing this all for the press or for his image. It does not feel genuine in my opinion.

Another thing that Trump fails to do in the introduction is say the words “race” or “racism” or “systemic racism” (but I wasn’t expecting that last one), which I feel is extremely problematic as the quote that I have been using from Joe Feagin’s Racist America basically states that, “Structures of domination shape everyday existence, but an insightful understanding of these structures and their recurring contradictions can assist people in forcefully resisting racial oppression.” He instead says that he wants to better schools, create more jobs and better wages, and safer communities. All great things, but why is this problem a problem in the first place? Name the problem, Mr. President!

While Feagin’s remarks and my statement may feel unrelated to Trump’s meeting or Black History Month in general, I firmly believe they are related. If we cannot address or even name the major problems we are having, how can we begin to fix them? While potentially unintentional, it seemed as if he is trying to cover up or talk around the greater issue of systemic racism in our country. We cannot “resist racial oppression” if we cannot name that it is there and as we move on in his presidency, I would like to dig deeper into why he is doing this and where his motivations lie.

My thoughts on James A. White Sr.’s “The little problem I had renting a house”

“Fifty-three years ago, James A. White Sr. joined the US Air Force. But as an African American man, he had to go to shocking lengths to find a place for his young family to live nearby. He tells this powerful story about the lived experience of “everyday racism” — and how it echoes today in the way he’s had to teach his grandchildren to interact with police.” – Ted.com

Blatant racism. Although others in this story may have tried to make it seem as if it had nothing to do with race, or there were just “no more vacancies”, I know, they know and James White and his family knew that they received the “no’s” they did because they were black. There is no way around it.

The story that James White shared is one that thousands, if not, millions of Black Americans experienced and still experience today. It seems a bit crazy, or completely “insane” as Mr. White puts it, but this is reality too many people.

In class we have talked a lot about how the history of the housing market in our country is deeply entrenched in racism. For years, Whites have had lots of “economic incentive” (based on the fact that houses were family’s greatest investment at the time) to leave neighborhoods that Black people were moving into or simply not let them live there at all. The practice of “blockbusting” (Links to an external site.) was very common. You may also have situations like the one in Raisin In the Sun where groups claiming to help improve neighborhoods actually pay Black people not to move into the houses they’ve bought in all-White neighborhoods. The lengths (White) people went through truly were “insane.”

What I found most fascinating about this video was his remarks on his family and conversations he has had with them about their own experiences. Firstly, I thought it was interesting that he had to point out in the beginning that none of his family members had served any jail time or had teen pregnancies and that they all were getting a good education. My first thought when hearing this was, “Great, but I wonder when Black people will be able to enter a conversation where they do not have to mention or prove at all that their family members have not had those problems.” Why is it that White people never begin conversations about their families in that way? Well, I believe I know the answer, but when will American society understand this and want to change it?

I enjoyed the advice that he tells his grandchildren and admire the way in which he strives to live out his life. Although not having the “luxury to be angry,” he takes his passion and dedicates himself to challenging racism wherever and whenever he sees it. I was inspired by his words as “systemic racism” often seems like an awfully large task to begin to analyze and eradicate and he made it sound like something anyone could do. He said if we elevate our “level of societal knowledge, awareness, and consciousness, we can truly begin to do this.

I believe these were Mr. White’s words for saying that people need to awaken to the realities of systemic racism and the fact that this problem has not gone away (only taken other forms) in order to most effectively eradicate the issue. This was exactly what I read from Joe Feagin’s book, “Structures of domination shape everyday existence, but an insightful understanding of these structures and their recurring contradictions can assist people in forcefully resisting racial oppression.”
This is something we have discussed a lot in class and something I felt this man has said so eloquently in his TedTalk. I am excited to further “challenge the insanity” in my own life that for years I have been afraid of confronting.

Picture Films – Ria

This week I wanted to focus on the film clips I am watching and next week I’ll focus more on the storyboarding process. I watched a film clip this weekend called “The Miseducation of Dylann Roof”. While watching it I realized that many of the documentaries we watch are picture based. I never noticed this because when we think of a picture film we think of something slightly boring and not so interactive. There is a way to use pictures to tell a story and a way to make pictures seem as though they are a piece of film instead. While paying attention to the craft only, I realized how much technique goes into these types of films. I think I will find times throughout the filmmaking process where I get frustrated due to running out of ideas on how to craft the pictures and what techniques to use on them. I want to compile a bunch of links with films that do a good job of engaging with pictures, one of them being the recent film clip on Dylann Roof. This is not a problem for me because I love watching documentaries, it would just be watching with a different intention: technique and craft.

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Here is the link to the video incase anyone is interested in the craft or even the topic (

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qB6A45tA6mE&sns=em

 

Week 1 of “The Sociology of Race, Power and Inequality”

My independent study is very different from others in the sense that it starts off as an intensive college course and ends with my own research. The course is called “The Sociology of Race, Power and Inequality” and is taught by T. Mauricio Torres ‘08 who actually taught this course at Syracuse University last year. Continue reading

The Mystery of Airline Loyalty Programs – Silver

At the end of my last blog, I mentioned how airlines have become so adept at differentiating their products that in a foreseeable future, a greater level of customer-driven customized flight experience can be expected. In fact, not only is this phenomenon a significant trend in the airplane seat development, it also represents a unique feature of the industry’s revenue composition. When I was building an eco-hotel business model in my Business & Society class back in the fall, I noticed that approximately 10% of hotel revenue comes from sources other than regular room rates. This seems quite reasonable: after all, meals, laundry, mini-bar expenses are often an important part of travelers’ hotel bills. However, I was surprised to find out that according to a consulting firm IdeaWorks, the ancillary revenue of traditional U.S. air carriers (non-inclusive of those low-cost competitors like Southwest) had 11.9% share of their total revenue in 2015, meaning that in average, when a major U.S. airline sells a $1,000 ticket, it would later get $119 more revenue from somewhere else. While these numbers seem to illustrate the power of the “customization” I have previously mentioned, they indicate something far more profound. A deeper look into IdeaWorks’ report suggests that nearly 55% of U.S. major airline ancillary revenue came from “sale of FFP (frequent flyer program miles).” In fact, aside from the seemingly excessive baggage and seat selection charges, airlines increasingly found frequent flier programs to be just as lucrative. Arguably, the proliferation of loyalty programs in airlines has become a definitive feature of the industry, shaping the modern-day air travel landscape in so many ways.

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American Airlines AAdvantage Program

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An Insightful Understanding – India

Prior to reading Joe Feagin‘s Racist America and enrolling in this course, race for me felt inherently linked with emotion. I knew, from experience, what it felt like to be a Black woman. I knew from my grandparents about my enslaved ancestors. I knew from my parents about how to converse with White people who could not comprehend how their privilege still functioned today. The one thing that had always been difficult for me to weave together was the connection between each of these events. Continue reading

Stop Believing in Yourself – Henry

I question what divides truth from belief.  In the undertones of both words at least, I find a distinct difference.  When one uses a word like truth, the connotation of discussion is understood.  It is supposedly based in fact and lived experiences, and therefore it is given integrity and is far less contestable.  Belief, on the other hand, does not carry this weight.  Less contestable, one is entitled to their belief(s). donald-trump-is-escalating-his-war-of-words-with-hillary-clinton It seems to me that this is the difference between being white or being a person of color in this country.  Whites have the choice to believe or not to believe in racism.  If they do believe in it, then they get to decide how far-reaching it is, where it comes into play not only in their own lives, but in the lives of oppressed people of color.  

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Research and Format – Ria

This week I spent a lot of my time researching different types of films and ways to make an engaging film about history. When I watch history films it is oftentimes hard for me to stay engaged if I do not have particular interest in the subject or is not made in a fun or interesting format. A film that is dense with information can be both hard to follow and also at times uninteresting. That being said, the format of the film can be just as crucial as the topic itself. Many would agree “it’s all in the presentation”. After looking at different types of films and watching trailers of all kinds I decided I wanted to make a picture film. After talking to my mentor he told me I can pull it off but there is also a chance it does not come out to be as engaging as I thought. I want my film to be comprised of photos depicting the stories I tell. I may include article headlines, photos of rulers, war scenes, perspectives from both Pakistan and India and Kashmir. I need a variation of photos in order to do this well and I need to learn many techniques. This will come from watching these types of films and replicating many techniques. I am excited to start storyboarding my video and laying out each scene: this has been the part of the seminar I’m most looking forward to doing.

Here is a link to some older history films made: Watching a film with the intention of looking at technique and format more so than the plot can provide a different lens to the film. http://www.history.com/films

A Guide to Contacting Your Representatives – KC

Congress(wo)men and Senators are not the only representatives elected by voters. From President to County Commissioner every citizen in this country has a ton of elected officials representing them in local and national ways.

In some ways, local politics has the ability to change your day to day life more than the President. From school board regulation, to municipal road maintenance, local politics and representatives are the ones impacting your everyday life the most. Continue reading

A Brief History of Airplane Seats – Silver

In the past week, I have been focusing on the evolution of airplane seats. Through this blog post, I will present a snapshot of this multifaceted and complicated piece of history. While I realize that I am far away from being an expert on many nuances and considerations that went into the seat design process, I hope that I can, at least, portray a general trend of development and provide some insights into how today’s air travel can be seen as a cumulative result of the past.

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