Category Archives: History and Current Issues

Taking the Helm

Recently, my younger sister picked up an immense social project where she is helping donate toys to CHOP. My little sister taking on this project is just one of many examples of young women in the world taking the helm and leading where the next generation will go. So, today I will be focussing this blog on the younger women of my age category (8-14) and sharing the stories of some extraordinary young women. Continue reading

Exploring Modern Cambodia–Nina

After discussing my research progress with T.Margaret over the last week, I decided to first explore modern Cambodia in the wake of the Khmer Rouge Movement before jumping straight into the unit on Czechoslovakia. So in this blog post, I will discuss some of my findings on the lasting impact of the Khmer Rouge Movement on aspects of Cambodian society today. Continue reading

So…I’m Back to Being Stalker…

Last year during our first semester, I wrote a blog titled I’m becoming a professional stalker… where I talk about how I have turned into a stalker trying to accomplish two goals: find extraordinary candidates to interview for The Girl Narrative and find their contact information (creepy I know). Now, in our third semester, I am going back to that as I find new girls to interview while transcribing previous interviews (you’ll see a blog about that later). Continue reading

Medicine in China during the Late Modern Era — Yuchen

In the last blog post, I looked at medicine in Europe during the Late Modern Era. It was a time period marked by numerous advances in medical biology, microanatomy, histology and other important subdivisions of medicine that represent the emergence of modern medicine. Meanwhile, on the other side of the world, China was forced out of its isolated state. The absolute authority of traditional Chinese medicine was also challenged by the intruding western medical tradition. Continue reading

Seeking “The Missing Picture” –Nina

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The Opening Scene, “The Missing Picture”

In the past semester, I completed my research on the development of Communism in Cuba and began to study the Cambodian Communist Revolution. Within the Cuba unit, I have had opportunities to understand the impact of the Cuban Revolution on various parties involved: Cuban-Americans, local Cubans, and the U.S. government. My analyses from reference articles, an interview, and a documentary helped me construct my own understanding of the revolution. Similarly, I have gathered information on the Khmer Rouge Movement in Cambodian from reading newspapers published during the revolution, statistical reports on the development of the Cambodian economy, examining case studies of the Cambodian education system, and viewing the last interview with Pol Pot. Continue reading

Medicine in the Late Modern Era in Europe — Yuchen

My research on the history of medicine from the last semester ended on the Renaissance Era and the Early Modern Age. In this new semester, I want to continue to study the advances in medicine along the timeline.

There is one change in format for my future blog posts: instead of covering Asia, the Middle East, and Europe all at once, each blog post will focus on medicine of one region in a certain time period. This new format provides me with more space to conduct in-depth research on medical advancements, important figures, and influence of other academic fields on medicine. In addition to studying history, I also want to reveal the interconnected nature of various disciplines. Continue reading

Tracing The Khmer Rouge Movement in Cambodia–Nina Wei

App-learning

The Khmer Rouge Movement

As promised in my last post, this week’s blog begins exploring the second unit: Communism in Cambodia. My interest in Cambodia’s Communist regime was sparked by my trip to Cambodia in 6th grade. Having Angkor Wat as the sole impression of the country before traveling, I was absorbed in learning more about Cambodian history during the visit. Our tour guide’s horrific accounts of the Khmer Rouge first introduced me to its violent communist era, and made me question historical backgrounds inducing such an appalling chapter in Cambodian history. In this unit of my independent, I will trace the origins of Cambodian Communism and examine the contexts that shaped the Khmer Rouge’s radicalized interpretation of Communist ideologies. Continue reading

RFK: Beginnings of Politics & Race Relations – Nawal

Rose And Joseph Kennedy Family 1938

Economy:

Robert F Kennedy was born into a wealthy family in 1925. Although they were in the Great Depression, his family never faced poverty like many Americans around them. The reason behind how exactly they got their fortune is very interesting. It would later be a surprising turn of events that Kennedy would focus on the country’s poverty problem when it had never affected him personally. Although the country was struggling financially, WWII was a major success for the economy. Before, there was concern that the economy would not get better after its plummet in 1929. Similar to Lyndon Johnson’s accomplishments being blinded by the Vietnam War, Herbert Hoover’s legacy as a president was overshadowed by the Great Depression. Poverty rates decreased by 21% between 1935 and 1950. It would decrease by another 6% from 1950 to 1960. Because of the prosperity, not much attention was paid to the country’s poverty. Although poverty had been significantly reduced over the 25 years, much of it was disproportionately racialized. There was a direct correlation between race and wealth. More black families were below the poverty line than white families. However, when it came to racial issues, many politicians did not think much about them, instead deciding to focus on foreign relations. Kennedy was one them, especially during the 1950s.  Continue reading