Category Archives: History and Current Issues

The End | Silver

I titled my first blog here for this semester’s independent research on the commercial aviation industry “the stories behind the metal birds.” The past few months were a blink. Now, at the end of May, I am sitting in front of my laptop composing my last blog entry. But before I revisit the “stories” I have looked over the course of my work, I want to first share a story about how I personally came to be fascinated by the airline industry.

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Afternoon view of the Hollywood Hills (picture taken by myself in January 2017) 

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My Last Blog Post this Semester – KC

This is the last blog post of the semester. I’ve learned so much and accomplished a ton throughout the semester while studying sex education and legislation.

What I’ve Accomplished/Completed:

  • Three academically written expose analyses of sex education and the state of education in Pennsylvania (awaiting publishing).
  • A step-by-step beginners guide to writing legislation.
  • A successful fundraiser that pulled in nearly $3000.00.
  • Draft of The Pennsylvania Healthy Youth Act 2017.
  • Draft of the bylaws for my organization.
  • Logo and design selection.
  • Purchased and registered my fictitious name.
  • Started web design.
  • Numerous blog posts.
  • A successful Facebook page.
Read More: Clean Up Work – KC

Topics I’ve learned about:

  • Financing and budgeting
  • Organizational infrastructure
  • Legislative history
  • Political Science
  • Advertising and Marketing
  • Healthcare Policy
  • Sexual Health

This is the most exciting and interdisciplinary project I’ve ever worked on. I’m excited to continue developing my 501(c)4 organization over the summer & next semester, and get it ready for the January 17th, 2018 launch.

Read More: Boost Your Business or Nonprofit With These Facebook Tips!

 

Behind the Incident of United Express Flight 3411: Part II | Silver

Part II: Implications 

As a continuation of my previous discussions about United Express Flight 3411, Part II includes a closer examination of the incident from perspectives of both United Airlines and today’s commercial aviation industry.

The end of Part I seems to suggest an easily-reached conclusion: since clauses regarding overbooking are specified in the contract of carriage, airlines could as easily deny a passenger to board if they see a greater economic interest in selling more tickets or accommodating other last-minute top-tier frequent flyers or VIPs. As long as airlines see a smaller marginal cost to denying a “regular passenger” onboard, they are free to do so within the legal frame. And in the case of United Express Flight 3411, the “VIPs” were four “deadhead crew” who needed to fly from their base in Chicago to Louisville to serve another flight. Again, what the crew on that flight did was perfectly legal: after 9/11, for security reasons, on U.S. commercial aircrafts, crew members are given the absolute authority and failure to comply with any of their instructions could result in the intervention of law enforcement. But this time, with the rapid spread of this incident’s footage on the Internet, the marginal cost of denying David Dao skyrocketed.

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Lufthansa 747-8 at Frankfurt Airport (picture taken by myself in March 2017) 

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Clean Up Work – KC

This week has been a lot of tedious work. I have been editing my first draft of the Pennsylvania Healthy Youth Act 2017, fixing my citations, and adding to my annotated bibliography. I touched base with the lawyer who is helping me fill out the paperwork for incorporation and finally have a reliable graphic designer. Hopefully by mid-may the design aspect, including the logo and coloring, of Keystone CASE will be complete. Another goal of mine is to have all the filing paperwork complete by the end of the year. Continue reading

Photo journal – Ria

This week I continued with my film along with work on my annotated bibliography. Most of the information is the same from my first semester independent project but there are many pictures I would need to cite. The film process is moving along smoothly so I decided to use this post as an opportunity to show some photos that will be in the video.

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Affirmative Action – Henry

Prompt: Given what your own experience, what are common misconceptions of affirmative action?

Our reading last week was all about education.  The reading focused in on the issue of affirmative action.  The major points relating to defining affirmative action as any preferred admissions statues.  This would include athletes, students of color, and legacies.  The biggest winners in terms of scholarship dollars and acceptances are athletes and legacies. Continue reading

Racial Authoethnography (Part 3 of 3) – India

Racial Autoethnography (Part 3 of 3)

This is the third and final part of my racial autoethnography for T. Mauricio’s class. It is not the whole part of the last 5 pages, because some of it was too personal to share online, but it most of it! Hope you enjoy! Image result for race

Right away when I came to Westtown’s campus, I noticed a difference in the way race was discussed. Not only was it addressed in all settings–my Peace and Justice class, in assemblies, in clubs, in Meeting for Worship–but it seemed like many people actually wanted to talk about it. There were also black students who were more vocal about their experiences at the school and outside of it in terms of race. Many of the stories and experiences that I heard were very similar to my own: not knowing what to do when a white classmate says the n-word, how to deal with or respond to ignorant comments about black hair, journeys of navigating a predominantly-white institution in general, etc. I was moved hearing them share stories so similar to my own, and by second semester, I joined SUMAA (Students United for Multicultural Action and Awareness) with a Latina friend. I desired a space where I, too, could speak freely about how I felt about my race and learn new things about myself and the experiences as I shared. Continue reading

Sneak Peak: Pennsylvania Healthy Youth Act 2017 – KC

Below is a sneak peak of the very first rough draft of the Pennsylvania Healthy Youth Act.


Amending the Public School Code of March, 10th 1949 (P.L. 30, No.14), entitled an act “relating to the public school system, including certain provisions applicable as well to private and parochial schools; amending, revising, consolidating and changing the laws relating thereto.” Continue reading

Racial Autoethnography (Part 2 of 3) – India

Racial Autoethnography (Part 2 of 3)

In addition, my early education at Westtown School, a historically and predominantly white institution, contributed to the way I experienced and thought about my racial identity. All of my teachers were white except for two during my whole elementary school experience and race did not come up too many times beyond Black History Month, or our slavery or Civil Rights Movement unit, but I do remember feeling conflicted about the way I thought about my own race. For example, there were times when I felt allowed to be proud of black people in general, during our jazz unit, or our black poetry unit, etc., but I never felt like I could be proud of myself as a black individual. Possibly because of our school’s mission for equality and essentially, “colorblindness”, we were taught that race was not something we should really think about or care about. As Bonilla-Silva suggests, dominant racial frames, or in this circumstance, the white racial frame, “provide the intellectual road map used by rulers (my white teachers and peers) to navigate the always rocky road of domination and… derail the ruled from their track to freedom and equality” (Bonilla-Silva, 74). I believe this colorblind ideology created less opportunities for me to recognize and be proud of my blackness. Continue reading