Category Archives: Communications

We’re in a serious relationship…actually a few…–Sabrina

Establishing another organization as your partner is not just a title or something you get to mention on your website. Having relationships with other nonprofit organizations or other business professionals who are in the same field as you and/or specialize in something you need to be done is crucial to the survival of your company. So…how do you get a partner and maintain your relationship? Continue reading

Our Social Media Presence – Sabrina

Screenshot (103)Through our posts, likes, and comments, our social media presence and maintaining it, is one of the most important parts of our business. Today, I am going to be talking about what we do on our social media pages, why it is important to do what we do, and how it has positively affected our business.


What We Do for Our Social media:

Our Posts

Using Tailwind, a post-scheduler app, The Girl Narrative schedules posts using our data on the most popular times our audience will be online, when we will get the most traffic, etc. The content that we post typically falls into one of three categories: Inspiring young women, programs or other media that talks about/educates women and/or girls or inspirational quotes. We have found that the mix and balance of these three types of posts most engage our three main audiences (young girls, programs that support/educate young girls, and the parents/mothers of young girls).

Our Engagement

Through our likes and comment on other brands and accounts, The Girl Narrative chooses to actively engage with other accounts through projects, likes, comments, and shares. This active engagement of other accounts has come back and promotes active engagement in our accounts. We have found that the more actively engaged we are, the more engagement we get in return, and thus the more traffic we get to our site in return.

Screenshot (104)Why We Use Social Media:

The reason that we have a social media page, particularly Instagram, is to connect with our three main audiences and create more traffic and excitement about our brand/nonprofit. As I stated before, our three main audiences include young girls, nonprofits/companies that support and/or educate young girls and women, and the parents (specifically the female guardians) of young women. We have found that Instagram is a good primary hub to connect to our first two audiences, as Instagram is a social media platform most used by young people and other organizations connecting to young people, and that Facebook is better for connecting to our third audience, the parents of young girls. Social media is, today, the prominent way of connecting and advertising, so it is only fitting that The Girl Narrative does the same in its outreach.

How Our Engagement Has Positively Affected Our Brand:

Since the launch of our 2018 Social Media Plan, The Girl Narrative has received an upturn of over 205% more traffic towards our site. If you are interested in seeing our 2018 Social Media Plan, please email, DM, or contact us through our social media pages or through our website, we’d be happy to share it with you! According to LYFE Marketing in an article titled The Importance of Social Media in Business, 71% of consumers are more likely to recommend a brand to others if they have a positive experience with it on social media. Because of the way that we continuously lift up, support, and otherwise give light to other lesser-known organizations, that we have received not only positivity and appreciation but heavy traffic towards our social media page and website as well.

Screenshot (105)

Whether it is through our liking, sharing, commenting, or posting, the active engagement of The Girl Narrative’s page has caused us to experience more traffic and customer engagement than ever, and we hope to continue this trend and only grow our engagement, and, in turn, our audience.  

 

Sabrina Schoenborn

CEO & Founder of

The Girl Narrative

 


Article Citation

Smith, Keran. “The Importance of Social Media in Business for Entrepreneurial Success.”

Digital Marketing Blog, LYFE Marketing, 12 Sept. 2018, www.lyfemarketing.com/blog/importance-social-media-business/.

 

Photo Citations

“The Girl Narrative (@Thegirlnarrative) • Instagram Photos and Videos.” The Girl Narrative

Instagram, http://www.instagram.com/thegirlnarrative/.

Why We Changed Our Name – Sabrina

I changed the name of my nonprofit from Project G.I.R.L to The Girl Narrative this previous summer 2018, and I don’t think I could have made a better decision for my business.


For the first 4 months of being Project G.I.R.L, things were going as any new business was going; we were beginning to build our foundation, our audience, and our marketing plan for the future. Later on, there were several issues that presented themselves that caused me to seriously reconsider our name.

 

1. Project G.I.R.L is great…but it’s generic

 

a. When I really got to thinking about it, When you hear the name Project G.I.R.L, you have no idea what we do, who we are, or what our goals are. It is beautiful and fantastic but is overall too generic. When you are building the foundation of your business there are two incredibly important things you need to have: consistency and clarity.  

 

2. There were other organizations that had similar names

 

a. I remember when I was interviewing Gauri Kapoor, CEO and founder of the after-school program The Girl and I (read our article about her daughter in the program here!), she got confused because she tried to look us up, but found another nonprofit organization. This was also not a one-time-incident. We were constantly confused with other organizations that sounded similar or had similar elements to Project G.I.R.L

 

3. Our message wasn’t clear

 

a. This is the biggest reason that we changed our name. Project G.I.R.L tells you nothing about what we want to achieve or why we are important. You would be able to guess that we had something to do with young female empowerment, but other than that, you would have no idea what we do.

LOGOThe Girl Narrative is unique, our own, and clearly states what we do. We TELL the Girl Narrative. We tell the stories of strong young women to inspire girls to be limitless. Now, with our new name, our partners like March Against Revenge Porn, Nonprofit Jenni, Live Girl (and more!), our audience, and our future customers (HINT! HINT!) will be able to find us, know us, and connect with us better. It doesn’t make it effortless, running a business is never effortless, but it does make things a little easier.

Signature

Sabrina Schoenborn 

CEO and Founder of

The Girl Narrative


Citations:

Kapoor, Gauri. “Home.” The Girl And I, http://www.thegirlandi.com/.

Schoenborn, Sabrina “Mahika Chopra.” The Girl Narrative,

https://thegirlnarrative.com/mahika-chopra/

Juliett, Leah. “#MARCH AGAINST REVENGE PORN.” March Against Revenge Porn,

marchagainstrevengeporn.org/.

Hargrove, Jenni. “Home.” Nonprofit Jenni, http://www.nonprofitjenni.com/.

West, Sheri. “Home.” LiveGirl, golivegirl.org/.

Schoenborn, Sabrina “Home.” The Girl Narrative, http://www.thegirlnarrative.com/.

 

 

 

Constantly Being Told “No.” – Sabrina

“No.”

“No.”

“No.”

“No.”

“No.”

“No.”

“No.”


NoRunning a business has truly been a test of patience. Being told no all day every day is exhausting, there is no way around that. It feels as if there is only a descent. As someone who was expecting some ups and downs, it was a harsh reality to realize that, for most of my process, it has been a straight descent. Continue reading

What have I written? Why does it matter? — Ethan

It’s the end of the semester, and I have 47 pages of polished writing. What have I shown?

I believe I’ve given an example of a mutually positive relationship between the U.S. government and a mainstream print media outlet, due to which the public reaction to a foreign policy event was to some degree determined by the coverage given by the print media outlet. I have demonstrated the connection between the foreign policy aims of American foreign policy leaders during and after the Six-Days’ War and those advocated and legitimized by the print coverage of the War by the New York Times. Further, I have explicated the symbiotic relationship between sources of information thought to be authoritative and credible, and the disseminators of that information, in order to substantiate the logical basis for that relationship in this specific instance of foreign policy. Continue reading

How Hitting a Button Began to Change My World-Sabrina

On May 2nd at 8:00 am on the nose, I hit enter and The Girl Narrative went live. It was accessible to the whole world, and I felt extremely exposed.

screenshot-54.pngThe way I had described it to my friends, was that I had a baby: I had been preparing in every way, shape, and form for months and then all of a sudden, one day, it just existed. It came into the world and seemed to take on a life of its own. I understand that this analogy is intense and a little crazy because it is. Continue reading

Training an Object Detector with TensorFlow (Part II)-Kevin

For last week’s blog post, I wrote a short tutorial for training a custom object detection model using TensorFlow Object Detection API. Due to the limited space and time constraints, my tutorial was not quite finished. Therefore, in this week’s blog, I will continue my tutorial and include additional steps such as the usage of a tool to test your model’s accuracy.

Continue reading

First Draft: Complete — Ethan

It’s a pretty good feeling, staring at page 47 of 47, at a draft that’s . . . rough, admittedly, but that also feels finished, feels completed. My mentor T. Olga has been looking over it this past weekend, and I’m anticipating her feedback and looking forward to refining my writing into a second draft. I’m sticking to my timeline well so far — I met my goal of finishing the first draft by May, and the second and third drafts by the time of my evaluation.

Another piece of my subsequent drafts will be formatting, of course, a different in-text citation style, and graphics. I haven’t had much experience with graphics before, but seeing as I’ve done intense analytical research into newspaper articles, parsing through them for several weeks, it would be useful to the reader if I condensed all that reading into a chart marking the evolution of the angle of the NYT’s coverage. Having done a preliminary ‘X’ chart, this is what the coverage looks like:

Screen Shot 2018-04-30 at 9.22.47 AM.png

From this, it’s visually clear that the coverage shifts from a description of the conflict itself to a nearly uniform coverage of the diplomatic battle that went on in the UN in the aftermath, with a particular focus on the Soviet and Israeli delegates, Alexsei Kosygin and Abba Eban.

There is also the matter of visualizing the relevant history and foreign policy. I took some inspiration for this from the Gantt chart I created back in sophomore year as part of T. Steve’s Design-Engineering Seminar. It’s meant to be used as an ultra-specific task planner, with flexibility to assign different types of tasks to different people over an indefinite period of time. Here’s how I adapted it for my purposes:

Screen Shot 2018-04-30 at 11.21.20 AM.png

Lastly, a quick update on publishing options: there is one for which a submission is due by May 15th, but with everything else going on up until the end of May, I won’t feel ready to submit for publication until the last few weeks of school.

 

Overall, exciting things all around going into the last month of fine tuning and reworking.

 

— EDM

Taxi Driver – Tony

This week I watched Taxi Driver directed by Martin Scorsese, a neo-noir movie that depicts the psychological predicament of a Vietnam War veteran named Travis. Set in the New York City of 1970s, this movie explores the conflict between a war hero who tries to stick to the older social norm of the era before his enrollment into the army and the new social landscape of America that took form in late the 1960s as a result of various social movements.

Travis, haunted by stress and insomnia, takes up the job as a nightshift “cabbie” to get himself busy. He is abhorred by the face that the city shows at night: “whores, skunk pussies, buggers, queens, fairies, dopers, junkies, sick, venal” (Scorsese, Taxi Driver). Apparently, he is not highly valued by the society, despite his honor in the war. His customer humiliates him with goffered dollar bills, which he can choose to do nothing about but put it in his pocket. His attempts to accost women are met by refusal and hostility, which leaves pornographic movies as his only channel to find sexual consolation. He writes so in his diary: “

“All my life needed was…someplace to go…I believe that someone should become a person like other people” (Scorsese, Taxi Driver).

His loneliness and sense of exclusion is clearly spelled through this line. He wishes for recognition, both from the society and women, yet both deny him. He detests to see morality and order breaking down at night, yet he is, at the same time, entrenched in porn movies and pills.

A key character in the story is Betsy, a secretary working for the campaign of the president candidate Palatine. An angel to Travis’ fascination, she lacks the potential threat that Marilyn Monroe poses to males, but at the same time possesses beauty and innocence. Travis sees her through the french window in her office, when she is fussed around by Tom, another male colleague of her. This man wears an Afro hairstyle, walks around in bright-colored suit and banters in lame jokes, a contradiction to Travis’ virility and conciseness. To Travis, Betsy’s innocence is an escape from the degraded world he is in. He successfully gains Betsy’s attention and invites her to a film. However, Betsy is astonished and repelled by the pornographic content in the film, which Travis enjoys as an outlet of his desire. Predictably, Betsy breaks with Travis and no longer answers his call. At the end of one scene, Travis intrudes into Betsy’s office to question why she has stopped talking to him.  Tom chases him away.

“Loneliness has followed me my whole life…There is no escape. I’m God’s lonely man” (Scorsese, Taxi Driver).

He turns to the black market to buy guns and starts planning vengeance on the society. His decision is to assassinate Palatine—–the politician Betsy works for—–someone he sees as an incarnation of corruption and hypocrisy. Not unexpectedly, this attempt fails.

This event brings Travis to his second fascination—–Iris. Iris works as a prostitute for a pimp called Sport. She once runs into Travis, but is then dragged away by a whoremaster. From Travis’ point of view, Iris is forced and trapped in this relationship, even though another scene shows Sport and Iris expressing deep affection towards each other. Travis undertakes a mission to rescue Iris—–take her home and send her to school—–even though she is content with her situation. He imagines himself as the heroic savior who now can prove his value and restore the older norm of the society.

His determination is put into action. He storms into brothel alone, shoots Sport right at his abdomen and proceeds to kill a gatekeeper and a client who has just finished with Iris. With a long interval in-between, the audience hears a thanks letter written by Iris’ parents to Travis in the next scene, which expresses their gratitude for returning Iris home. Travis is now acclaimed by the paper as a hero, but he continues his life as a cabbie. At the end, Betsy runs into him and expresses her regret, but he only replies, “So long” and drives his cab away (Scorsese, Taxi Driver).

Many critics find the last scene a fantasy in Travis’ dying moments (Ebert). In this consummated version of his life, he is elevated from the dirty sewage in New York and his virility is recognized. The ending is a milestone in film history, because while it temporarily raises up Travis as the hero, he resumes his low-profile life as a “nameless hero.” A typical plot development of older films, in which the male protagonist eventually comes together with the femme fatale, starts to give way to the characterization of a lonely hero. The male hero does not need a woman to cooperate with him, nor does he even need her in his private life. He tackles the problem by himself, while standing alone for the rest of the time. He is not particularly a misogynist or an aseuxal man, but partnership and relationship do not play a role in his life.

This prototype of a lonely and emotionless hero plays in later American films,  including Rambo in First Blood, who happens to be a Vietnam veteran as well. It fulfills a masculine fantasy of hidden honor and recognition, when the society no longer recognizes a middle-class heterosexual male as the only exemplar of success.

Travis epitomizes the social exclusion and estrangement that the Vietnam War veterans found when they came back home after years in a strange place. America had become a new place, yet they still clutched to the older society in their memory. Travis could not understand why Iris would want to stay with Sport:

Travis: “That guy Sport is a killer.”

Iris “Sport never killed nobody… He is a Libra.”

     “I’m a Libra too. That’s why we get along so well.”

Travis: “Looks like a killer to me” (Scorsese, Taxi Driver).

His action to kill the pimp and return Iris home is more of a desperate move to assert his value as a man and to bring the society “back on track”. In a way, this film records the collision between the old America and a new America, which in many respects is still happening today.

Works Cited

Ebert, Roger. “Taxi Driver Movie Review & Film Summary (1976) | Roger Ebert.”RogerEbert.com, 1 Jan. 2004, http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/great-movie-taxi-driver-1976.

Scorsese, Martin, director. Taxi Driver. Amazon, Columbia Pictures, 1976, http://www.amazon.com/Taxi-Driver-Cybill-Shepherd/dp/B000I9U7C4.