Monthly Archives: May 2017

The End | Silver

I titled my first blog here for this semester’s independent research on the commercial aviation industry “the stories behind the metal birds.” The past few months were a blink. Now, at the end of May, I am sitting in front of my laptop composing my last blog entry. But before I revisit the “stories” I have looked over the course of my work, I want to first share a story about how I personally came to be fascinated by the airline industry.

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Afternoon view of the Hollywood Hills (picture taken by myself in January 2017) 

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My Last Blog Post this Semester – KC

This is the last blog post of the semester. I’ve learned so much and accomplished a ton throughout the semester while studying sex education and legislation.

What I’ve Accomplished/Completed:

  • Three academically written expose analyses of sex education and the state of education in Pennsylvania (awaiting publishing).
  • A step-by-step beginners guide to writing legislation.
  • A successful fundraiser that pulled in nearly $3000.00.
  • Draft of The Pennsylvania Healthy Youth Act 2017.
  • Draft of the bylaws for my organization.
  • Logo and design selection.
  • Purchased and registered my fictitious name.
  • Started web design.
  • Numerous blog posts.
  • A successful Facebook page.
Read More: Clean Up Work – KC

Topics I’ve learned about:

  • Financing and budgeting
  • Organizational infrastructure
  • Legislative history
  • Political Science
  • Advertising and Marketing
  • Healthcare Policy
  • Sexual Health

This is the most exciting and interdisciplinary project I’ve ever worked on. I’m excited to continue developing my 501(c)4 organization over the summer & next semester, and get it ready for the January 17th, 2018 launch.

Read More: Boost Your Business or Nonprofit With These Facebook Tips!

 

Results – Tom

After all of my work this semester, I have finally finished my experiment. While it took five days of running the experiment, I was able to get a pretty decent yield. Overall, I had 83 good results, which is over a fifth of the entire school. I ended up having to throw out a handful because something or other went wrong during the experiment. Most often this was because they choose to reject but never proposed a counter offer. Continue reading

Watcher – A New App

It has been nearly a year since I last opened Xcode, Apple’s development environment for iOS and watchOS. One day, when I was rushing to an early morning class, I subconsciously patted my left pocket and realized that I had left my phone in my dorm room. I also took notice that I was wearing my Apple Watch, the device that I frequently use to ping my iPhone when I misplace it. While the watch does help me find my phone by allowing me to play a ringing sound on my phone, it doesn’t do so proactively. Wouldn’t it be nice to have an app on my Apple Watch that notifies me when the iPhone is out of range, I thought.

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The Last Blog Post

For my last blog post, I’m just going to give you guys another excerpt from my work. This isn’t the most recent writing that I have completed, but it begins where I left off in my second to last blog post. It’s been an interesting journey this year. Here it is:

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Behind the Incident of United Express Flight 3411: Part II | Silver

Part II: Implications 

As a continuation of my previous discussions about United Express Flight 3411, Part II includes a closer examination of the incident from perspectives of both United Airlines and today’s commercial aviation industry.

The end of Part I seems to suggest an easily-reached conclusion: since clauses regarding overbooking are specified in the contract of carriage, airlines could as easily deny a passenger to board if they see a greater economic interest in selling more tickets or accommodating other last-minute top-tier frequent flyers or VIPs. As long as airlines see a smaller marginal cost to denying a “regular passenger” onboard, they are free to do so within the legal frame. And in the case of United Express Flight 3411, the “VIPs” were four “deadhead crew” who needed to fly from their base in Chicago to Louisville to serve another flight. Again, what the crew on that flight did was perfectly legal: after 9/11, for security reasons, on U.S. commercial aircrafts, crew members are given the absolute authority and failure to comply with any of their instructions could result in the intervention of law enforcement. But this time, with the rapid spread of this incident’s footage on the Internet, the marginal cost of denying David Dao skyrocketed.

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Lufthansa 747-8 at Frankfurt Airport (picture taken by myself in March 2017) 

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